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20121002
20121010
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heating up, and one city's efforts to cool down. >> ifill: and ray suarez has the story of a mexican drug lord killed in a gunfight, and his corpse stolen from the funeral home. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the former football coach who plunged penn state university into scandal by his sexual abuse of young boys over many years was sentenced today. the judge called his crime a "story of betrayal." jerry sandusky wore a red jail jump suit and a smile as he entered the center county courthouse this morning, less than two hours later, the smile was gone after th
of history have marched through the streets. an ancient city that has been fought over many times before. today, aleppo is at war again. the further you edge into the old city, the sound and fury of battle grows. those who stayed behind must cheat death every day. a simple sign reads, do not cross, sniper to your left. seven or eight people were killed to last week, he says. the rebels have moved into the path of the old city. activist took us there. a world heritage site where the scars of battle run deep and the devastation is mounting. aleppo is a city under siege. the fighting is now street by street, house by house. the fighters have been calling for outside help for many months. for the first time, a strong indication they're getting it. the ukrainian weapons firms made the box and its contents for the royal saudi army. how would ended up in the roiled -- in a rebel base in aleppo is not clear. interests, both sides get help from abroad in a proxy war that threatens a fragile region. the atmosphere on the front line is incredibly tense and almost eerily quiet. you can hear the soun
done by coral bleaching which has been caused by rising water temperatures and increase the city. the result, a global climate change. >> as nothing else changes, the outlook looks pretty bad. the paper we just had published suggests that it was the same conditions over the next 10 years, we would see further reduction by half. remember, these changes are happening before the major impact of climate change kicks in. >> the government says they are spending hundreds of millions of dollars trying to protect the great barrier reef. the u.n. says that unless more is done, the reef risks losing its world heritage list davis. this would turn into a political and ecological disaster. it has just been stand by .oog are these pictures about to go from being an up-to-date window on the "masterpiece to a collection for an archive? >> a thrilling sport tradition or a crow and antiquated form of entertainment? in mexico, the debate is raging on whether to ban bullfighting. >> it is still one of the most controversial past times in the americas. bullfighting has been practiced in mexico since
the vegetables. >> reporter: these days, small neighborhood gardens are also popping up all over the city on previously abandoned lots and even in some residents' backyards. this past summer, 30,000 teenage volunteers -- unmistakable in their in brightly colored t-shirts -- arrived in new orleans from lutheran congregations across the country to help till and plant. sanjay kharod works to connect local residents with organizations and groups, like these lutheran volunteers, that can help them grow food. >> there's a long history of growing in the city, and what we're trying to do is we're trying to encourage people to do that again. >> reporter: by and large, residents have reacted enthusiastically. >> i go to the store, if i decide to buy me some strawberry, pop one of them open, taste it, and there's no taste to it. you know, and i grew strawberries in my yard and picked that, and they're nice and sweet. >> reporter: food deserts have become more numerous in new orleans since the hurricane. according to the congressional hunger center, the average grocery store here now serves 16,000 pe
people in america who are out of work, but still ahead, i'll introduce you to two new york city firms that can't hire workers fast enough. >> tom: the federal government made what it called one of the largest medicare fraud crackdowns today, arresting dozens of people across seven cities, accusing them of cheating medicare out of $430 million. today's busts involved 91 people, including doctors, nurses, and hospital administrators, including these arrests in miami. among the scams-- the president of riverside general hospital in houston and his son are accused of giving medicare patients food and cigarettes for claiming to get hospital care, but instead watched tv or played games. federal prosecutors said that scheme led to $158 million in fake bills. today's action, announced by the justice department, stretched from brooklyn to los angeles. >> this is something i think we see at a variety of levels. we see it among people who are health care professionals who take oaths to provide care and do no harm, and in fact they are doing great harm. we are going after people, whatever their p
to triple "a", but some cities are experiencing even higher prices. for drivers, the good news is prices are expected to fall, but california remains vulnerable to quick price hikes. refinery and pipeline problems have put the squeeze on supplies and california drivers. >> well its pretty crazy. >> i think it sucks. big time i mean its terrible" >> the went up pretty high from last week." >> they just jump them up real quick and then it takes forever to get them back down again it is pretty ridiculous. >> tom: today's average price in the state, $4.67 a gallon for regular unleaded. that's $0.50 higher than a week ago. $0.86 higher than the national average. wholesale gas prices fell today after california governor jerry brown yesterday eased the state's gas-blend requirements. the change allows refiners to start processing a less- expensive winter fuel blend today, about three weeks ahead of schedule. california's strict air quality standards require a specific gasoline blend that's not necessary in other states, resulting in only a handful of refiners making it. the price spike came aft
by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: anders fogh rasmussen is here, he is the secretary general of nato, he was the prime minister of denmark for eight years before assuming his current post in 2009. he is in new york for the u.n. general assembly, nato has significantly redefined its mission since its founding in 1949. it's primarily-- last year it enforce add no-fly zone in libya and the campaign that overthrew moammar qaddafi. i'm pleased to have the secretary general at this table, welcome. tell me how you have defined the role for nato in the current environment, especially in the middle east. >> the core role is still to protect our citizens against any threat to their security we won the cold war. we protected our citizens against soviet communism, aggression. we won the cold war. the soviet broke down but after the end of the cold war we realized that we are faced we merging security challenges, terrorism, this is the reason why we are in afghanistan. that's why we are now building a nato missile defense system to protect ou
. the city had been a power center for al-shabab, the group that's fought somalia's internationally backed government for years. al-shabab is allied with al- qaeda, but the militants now have been driven out of all of somalia's major cities. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the men at the top of the presidential tickets hunkered down again today for debate preparation, ahead of the big meeting tomorrow night. but they also managed to break away briefly-- president obama for a visit to the hoover dam, and governor romney out with an aide to buy lunch, a burrito. meanwhile, their running mates made multiple stops in key states. vice president biden told a crowd in charlotte, north carolina that mitt romney would raise taxes on most americans to fund tax cuts for the wealthy. >> how they can justify raising taxes on the middle class has been buried the last four years. how in lord's name can they justify raising their taxes with these tax cuts? look, folks, we've seen this movie before. massive tax cuts for the wealthy. eliminating restrictions on wal
the heaviest bombardment in months. thick plumes of smoke could be seen rising above the central city's skyline as syrian government warplanes, tanks and artillery intensified their assault. meanwhile, turkish media reported syrian troops fired another mortar round into southern turkey. no one was hurt, but the turkish military returned fire. a similar exchange earlier this week left several dead on both sides. the turmoil deepened today in south africa's mining industry. the world's largest platinum producer, amplats, fired 12,000 miners for staging an unlawful strike. it was the latest turn in two months of labor unrest and violence in south africa. in august, police shot and killed 34 strikers working for another major platinum concern. nearly 80,000 miners are currently striking across the country. the highest court in britain ruled today that five terror suspects can be extradited to the u.s., including abu hamza al-masri. the radical muslim preacher, and the others, had fought extradition for years. al-masri's mosque in london was known as a training ground for radical islamists in the 19
city of aleppo. the attack was on a government- controlled section. the coordinated explosions hit a central square, destroying a number of buildings and littering the streets with twisted metal and concrete. at least 122 people were wounded. and the death toll was expected to rise as crews work through the rubble. in iran, riot police and protesters came to blows over the collapse of the national currency. the rial has lost a third of its value in less than a week. today, merchants at tehran's main bazaar protested outside their stalls and closed for the day. exchange houses and currency websites also were closed down. in the end, police arrested money changers and fired tear gas to disperse crowds. the protesters charged president mahmoud ahmadinejad's policies have fueled the currency crisis. he has blamed western sanctions imposed against iran's nuclear program. secretary of state hillary clinton pledged anew today to get to the bottom of a deadly attack in libya last month. u.s. ambassador christopher stevens and three other americans were killed after gunmen assaulted the u.s
. and on her way into the city, her convoy was jeered. with the doctors and nurses trying to block the street. >> she is here to show support for the greek people but on the streets, there is huge restoration. in just five years, this economy has shrunk 23%. just a short distance from where she was meeting, protesters attacked the barricades. for two hours, there were running battles with the police, volleys of tear gas being fired. the greek prime minister if he believed that the visit marked the end of greece's international isolation. >> everybody that the on greece collapsing will lose the bet. greeks are proud people. they deliver support for greece to stand. handoff and despite the fact this is a difficult path, it will prove worthwhile. if you don't get to solve the problems now, they will reoccur later in a much more dramatic way. >> in difficult times lie ahead. greece has to make further savings to qualify for more funding. without it, the country runs out of money in november. they said greece is likely to miss the target. >> for more on the less than hospitable welcome she receive
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. rose. >> rose: riccardo muti is here, he is one of the world's great conductors and led some of the best orchestras, including the vienna philharmonic, he is currently music director o director of the chicago symphony orcstra, critics and audiences alike have been dazed and charmed which the intensity, the technique, the emotion that he and his musicians bring. here is a look at a performance of verdi requiem. ♪ .. ♪ ♪ >> rose: muti and the chicago symphony orchestra in new york, to open the season at carnegie hall on october 3rd, they are performing orff's carmina burana, i am happy to have mastery i are back at this table, when you are conducting what are you thinking about? what is going through your head are you hearing the music instantaneously in your head that you know the score or what? >> this is a difficult, it is difficult to answer this question. in any case the conductor starts the performance one frac shun of a second before and ends one second of a frac shun before. >> rose: yes. >> so it is almost a lit
captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. it's time to do nation building right here at home. >> that future is out there, it is waiting for us. >> tonight the special edition of charlie rose. >> rose: welcome to our program. we're live this evening from new york, denver los angeles and washington. president obama and governor romney faced off tonight in the first of three debates before election day on november 6th. domestic policy was in focus during the 90-minute showdown at the university of denver. the platform gave govern romney an opportunity to reignite his campaign which has suffered some this summer. they sparred across a range of issues. >> there's a various done of small businesses across the country saying what's the effect of obamacare in your hiring plans. three quarters said it makes us less likely to hire people. i just don't know how the president could come into office, facing 23 million people out of work, rising unemployment and economic crises at the kitchen table, and spend his energy and passion for
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with politics, governor romney was the clear winner last night in the first of the three presidential debates, his performance revived a campaign dogged by weakening poll numbers a candidate emerged that republicans hoped for, friends often describe but the electorate had yet to encounter. >> that was survey done of small businesses across the country, said what has been the effect of obama care on your hiring plans and three quarters of them said it makes us less likely to hire people. i just don't know how the president could come into office, facing 23 million people out of work, rising unemployment and economic crisis at the kitchen table and spend his energy and passion for two years fighting for obama care instead of fighting for jobs for the american people. >> i have my own plans, not the same as simpson-bowles but in my view the president should have grabbed it if he wanted to make adjustments take it, go to congress and fight it. >> that's what we have don
's day february 15 we saw you, american capital a private equity public traded company up 30% plus. city national up 9%. do you still like these? >> definitely. believe it or not, american capital still trading at three times earnings, despite its appreciation. and it's a perfect play on mid cap companies in the u.s. and certainly monies cheap too. so it's a great way to play the recovery. >> tom: mark, do you own position in all four of the stocks we mentioned tonight? >> yes, we do. >> tom: mark watson, street critique with keel asset management. >> susie: tomorrow on "n.b.r." we'll get wall street's reaction to the presidential debates and the impact on the markets, and the economy. plus, we'll get a closer look at the federal reserve's take on the economy when it releases the minutes from its latest policy meeting. and this restaurant chain could be the future of fast food for healthy eaters, we'll talk to the man behind "lyfe kitchens". >> tom: by the looks of today's jobs data, companies stepped up their hiring last month. we'll see the official government numbers on friday. despit
studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: the debate over the widening economic divide there this country has intensified it helped spark the occupy wall street movement one year ago and has also been a key issue the presidential campaign as the economy continues to falter. >> this country doesn't succeed when only the rich get richer. we succeed when the middle class gets bigger. >> rose: josepzeri pi wginnnel g economist. in his new book the price of inequality, how today's divided society zedaeners our future. he argues that a wealthy minority in this country has fed a vicious circle of growing inequality. i'm pleased to have joe stiglitz back at this table. welcome. >> nice to be here. >> rose: where do you think the american economy is today? and is it trending upwards? >> it's not really trending upward. i guess i would describe it as part of-- i call it a long slump, long malaise unless we do something. >> rose: right. >> you know there are two big gaps in our economy, relative to say 2007 before the crisis. one is real estate. real estate was the big sector, the
. the investigation focused on alleged fraud in seven cities. sensitive u.s. documents still aren't fully secured at the burned-out american consulate in benghazi, libya, three weeks after it was attacked. the "washington post" reported today the papers detailed weapons collection operations, personnel records, and the schedule for u.s. ambassador christopher stevens, who died in the attack. in washington today, state department spokeswoman victoria nuland acknowledged only two private guards are protecting the site. >> we have had some challenges securing the site. we are continuing to talk to the libyan side about that. but this was not-- based on what we've seen-- any kind of breach of classified information. >> sreenivasan: meanwhile, the f.b.i. confirmed a team of agents visited benghazi yesterday, for the first time. until now, the group had stayed away, due to security concerns. a long-standing battle over google's book-scanning project was settled today. authors and publishers filed suit against the company back in 2005, saying it violated their copyrights. google launched the project a y
. on tuesday, we'll look at rising temperatures in urban areas, and one city's efforts to cool down. i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online, and again here tomorrow evening. thank you, and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lprreehtiodr onucsac captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org1
learned as mayor of this city and governor of stra. if we invest in talent, vest in infrastructure, level the playing field for small businesses, we'll grow the economy. we see some positive signs, but frankly, we have a ball and chain and that's congress. congress is holding us back. and what we need to do is change congress especially in two ways. we need people who are more fiscally responsible and we need more people who know frankly the basics about how to work together. you will hear about these themes a lot tonight in my comments. concerning fiscal responsibility, i was the governor that drew a tough straw. i was governor in the worst recession sin the 1930s and i had to cut $5 billion from the state budget, including my own salary. i'm the only governor in modern times that left office with a smaller general fund budget than when i started. i know how to be fiscally responsible. my opponent has a different record. he went into the united states senate in 2001 with the biggest surpluses in the history of the united states and six years later, left with massive deficits. during his
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)

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